Knowledge of Narimono

Instruments used for Narimono

Example of Debayashi Instruments

– Instruments that are used on stage along with shamisen and voice –

Kotsuzumi
Kotsuzumi
Okawa
Okawa
Shime Daiko
Shime Daiko

Example of Kagebayashi Instruments

– Instruments that are used at the side of the stage for different signs and sound effects –

Hiradaiko
Hiradaiko
Okedo Daiko
Okedo Daiko
Rei
Rei
Atarigane
Atarigane
Orgel
Orgel
Chappa
Chappa
Dora
Dora
Mokugyo
Mokugyo
Hyoshigi
Hyoshigi
Mokusho
Mokusho
Naruko
Naruko
Water bird whistle
Water bird whistle
Bush wabler whistle
Bush wabler whistle
Yotsutake
Yotsutake
Hyoshiban & Hanogi
Hyoshiban Hariogi

about Narimono

Narimono, or Hayashi is more than just Japanese percussion.  There are dozens of different applications for narimono, many of which produce sound effects and musical cues.  Certain sounds of  narimono are so distinctive, that they can be used in place of words, as a form of communication.

Narimono is used to accompany Nagauta and other classical Japanese theatre music. The kotsuzumi, okawa, and taiko drums are used on the stage.  We also play other drums, percussion, and sound effects instruments behind the scenes.  Narimono forms the heart and soul of Kabuki music.  
Instrumental combinations are performed in complex patterns to support the flow of Kabuki theatre.

 

Kabuki Style Music